August 5, 2009

Short Cuts: "Then We'll Have to Look After Ourselves"

Lord of the Flies (1963). Directed by Peter Brook; written by Peter Brook, adapted from the novel by William Golding; starring James Aubrey, Tom Chapin, Hugh Edwards, Roger Elwin, and Tom Gaman.


6 comments:

  1. Wow! I love this movie! Love the black-and-white and some of the very naturalistic acting. Also, great location.

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  2. I originally saw the 90's version with Balthazar Getty (what a name, right) and I loved that one for years. Still do, I guess. But I saw this one as part of an Ethics of Leadership class a few years ago in grad school, and also appreciated the toned-down effects and more dreamy, less cinematic style of the original. Interesting that few of the kids had read the book, most of the scenes weren't scripted, and the themes were considered so mature in the UK upon its release that none of the kids were allowed to even attend the premiere. Ah, how far we've come.

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  3. The Balthazar Getty version is better than the critics gave it credit for, but I was always leery of using it with my literature classes because of the vulgarity. But I understand the desire by the filmmakers to want to offer an update. Some kids of course prefer it because it's in color. Anyway, the black-and-white Peter Brooks version here is a longtime favorite of mine, and I recently offered a screen cap of it with a piece on high school movie choices created by T.S. of Screen Savour, a good friend of yours. The film is moody, atmospheric and fully captures the disturbing context of the William Golding novel, one of the most popular high school novels unrelentingly for decades. For me, it's lways the #2 choice behind TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD (Harper Lee).

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  4. Daniel and Sam - I also enjoy the 90s version. It updated the time period - but it stayed true to the story.

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  5. Amen, Hokahey.

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  6. Sorry for the delayed response...I'm glad you both enjoyed the 90's version, too, which is a bizarre statement considering how much I've been against remakes lately.

    Anyway, I need to catch up with that list, Sam, and I agree that TKAM is another classic that received a solid movie treatment.

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